Search

BelieveNo1

News, facts, investigations, refutations and more…

Tag

sex

Okinawa base worker to admit rape, but not intentional murder

A former U.S. base worker will admit to a charge of rape leading to the death of a Japanese woman last year, a new development in the case that rocked the tiny island prefecture and led to a surge in anti-American sentiment.

Kenneth Franklin Gadson, a former Marine who worked as a civilian at a Kadena Air Base cable and internet company, said through his attorneys that he killed Rina Shimabukuro, 20, while attempting to rape her, according to Naha District Court documents filed Friday.

“We do not dispute the charge of rape resulting in death,” the documents said, adding that Gadson admits to striking Shimabukuro on the head from behind while attempting to rape her. “As a result, the victim died … The defendant had no murderous intent, therefore we dispute the charge of murder.”

Gadson’s first pretrial conference is scheduled for March 10. The trial is expected to begin sometime around June.

The admission’s timing surprised some legal scholars, since prosecutors haven’t yet presented evidence in court. It was most likely an attempt at a lesser sentence by showing remorse, which is considered very important in the Japanese justice system.

“Generally speaking, if you do not admit anything while there is obvious evidence, the attitude is seen as atrocious, with no remorse; thereby, the sentence tends to be longer,” said Tetsumi Takara, a law professor at the University of the Ryukyus.

Takara said the death penalty cannot be discounted in this case, though it is rarely handed down in cases involving a single death.

“There is a possibility that he chose this route for a lesser sentence by giving a good impression to [the civilian] judges (similar to an American jury),” Takara said. “Having said that, it is still strange to admit the charge before trial.”

Gadson was charged with murder and rape resulting in death by Japanese prosecutors two months after Shimabukuro disappeared on April 28. He was also charged with the illegal disposal of a body.

Following interrogation, he took police to the wooded area where her remains were found. He confessed to the crime, police said, but his lawyers argued he was questioned while under the influence of sleeping pills after a suicide attempt.

Gay Acceptance in the U.S Military

Throughout its history, the US Military  had an inconsistent policy when it came to homosexuals in the military. Prior to World War II, there was no written policy barring homosexuals from serving, although sodomy was considered a crime by military law ever since Revolutionary War times. In 1778, Lieutenant Gotthold Frederick Enslin became the first soldier to be drummed out of the Continental Army for sodomy.

Homosexuality Policies in the Korean War and Vietnam War

During World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War, the military defined homosexuality as a mental defect and officially barred homosexuals from serving based on medical criteria. However, when personnel needs increased due to combat, the military developed a habit of relaxing its screening criteria. Many homosexual men and women serviced honorably during these conflicts. Unfortunately, these periods were short-lived. As soon as the need for combat personnel decreased, the military would involuntarily discharge them.

1982 – Complete Ban of Gays in the Military

It wasn’t until 1982 that the Department of Defense officially put in writing that “homosexuality was incompatible with military service,” when they published a DOD directive stating such. According to a 1992 report by the Government Accounting Office, nearly 17,000 men and women were discharged under this new directive during the 1980s.

The Birth of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” 1993

By the end of the 1980s, reversing the military’s policy was emerging as a priority for advocates of gay and lesbian civil rights. Several lesbian and gay male members of the military came out publicly and vigorously challenged their discharges through the legal system.

By the beginning of 1993, it appeared that the military’s ban on gay personnel would soon be overturned.

President Clinton announced that he intended to keep his campaign promise by eliminating military discrimination based on sexual orientation. But, this didn’t sit well with the Republican-controlled Congress. Congressional leaders threatened to pass legislation that would bar homosexuals from serving if Clinton issued an executive order changing the policy.

After lengthy public debate and congressional hearings, the President and Senator Sam Nunn, chair of the Senate Armed Services Committee, reached a compromise which they labeled Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell, Don’t Pursue. Under its terms, military personnel would not be asked about their sexual orientation and would not be discharged simply for being gay. However having sexual relations, or displaying romantic overtures with members of the same sex, or telling anyone about their sexual orientation is considered “homosexual conduct” under the policy and is a basis for involuntary discharge.

This is was known as the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” law and became the Department of Defense policy.

Changing Times for Society and the Military

At the time, most military leaders and young enlisted folk (who were forced to live in the barracks with a roommate) took a conservative view about allowing gays to serve openly in the military. But the attitudes of society changed through the next two decades. By 2010, most junior enlisted (the one’s who have to live in the barracks), today, saw nothing wrong with homosexuality and would not be bothered by serving with those they know to be gay. Today, almost everyone gets a single room (with no roommate) following basic training and job school. In those few situations where military personnel share living accommodations (such as deployments and ships), it is generally several military members living together.

Repeal of Don’t Ask Don’t Tell 2010

In December of 2010, the House and Senate voted in favor to repeal the policy known as “don’t ask, don’t tell.” President Obama then signed it into law December 22, 2010. A repeal is ant action of revoking or annulling a law or congressional act. The nation decided that by September 20, 2011, homosexuals would no longer fear discharge from the military by admitting to their sexual preference. Homosexuals have the freedom to serve in the armed forces openly.

Over 13,000 servicemen and women were discharged for being gay while the don’t ask, don’t tell policy was in effect. The repeal has prompted many to try and reenlist. Many men and women who have been serving came out of the closet on various media. Many organizations and groups supporting gay and lesbian military members surfaced and have even organized official public gatherings with the military.

Recognition of Same-Sex Marriages

Following the Supreme Court ruling that struck down the Defense of Marriage Act in 2013, the Department of Defense announced it would extend spousal and family benefits for same-sex marriages that would be the same as those given for traditional marriages.

Transgender Regulations Repealed 2016

Another frontier was crossed when the ban on service by openly transgender persons in the military was repealed on July 1, 2016.

The ‘democratic’ nation

These videos show us who american military forces and servants of their government really are. They are the servants of evil forces who’s only purpose is to bring pain and suffer, to take all that their lands give, kill everybody and go to another place just like virus or desease.

Sexual assaults in the US miliary

That ugly word is rape. Both by the enemy and their own fellow soldiers and commanders. The ugly fact is that female soldiers are targets of men and their aggression and mental attitudes, that all lead to rape, murder, harassment, and abuse. The American public is worried about sending their daughters in combat zones were they could be captured and sexually assaulted by the enemy, the odd thing is that the vast majority of sexual assaults against women in the military are committed by their fellow soldiers. Originally, political leaders and military brass were worried about the effect of having young women in body bags coming home could have on public opinion about the war, now that conversation has altered. Mostly, female soldiers have to worry about their own commanders and fellow soldiers during deployment and back home. As one writer put it: “Women soldiers have to watch their back twice: once on the battlefield and again when behind the wire.” The statistics are damning: the US military has about 14% of their population being serial sexual predators that prey on both men and women in the service. Within the normal United States population that number is around 7%. In 2012, about 26,000 women and some men experienced a form of sexual  assault. This is a jump of 10,000 (or 34% increase) from 2011. Out of the 1.2 million servicemebers in the US Military, about 200,000 are women. Only about 3,000 cases are reported to the DoD, and only a few hundred of these cases receive any type of legal action. 96 resulted in court marshal. In just one branch, the overall statistic was one-in-five women in the military is a victim of sexual assault in the US Air Force. Overall, some 500,000 women in the military have been sexual assaulted since the 1st Gulf War. That is a hard number to deal with.

Abu Ghraib Torture Coming Home to Roost – USA Police State Strip-Search

Sexual Abuse of H.Steffey Ohio 2006

Sex crimes by American service personnel rise in Japan

Media reports say that the number of sexual assaults by US military personnel in Japan is spiraling.

Based on the reports, American military personnel were involved in more than one-thousand sex crimes between 2005 and 2013. The number is strikingly high on the island of Okinawa. Around half of the 50000 US forces in Japan are based on the island. Sex crimes against Okinawans have provoked protests against the US military presence there. Reports also say that the judgment process of these crime cases is very inconsistent. The cases are usually reduced to lesser charges and in nearly two thirds of the cases the convicts have not been incarcerated. Instead, they’ve been demoted or received a letter of reprimand.

AP Investigation

Records of sexual assaults in the U.S. military in Japan, obtained by The Associated Press through the Freedom of Information Act, are opening a rare window into the opaque world of military justice.
AP analysis found the handling of allegations verged on the chaotic, with seemingly strong cases often reduced to lesser charges.
Even when military authorities agreed a crime had been committed, the suspect was unlikely to serve time.
Nearly two-thirds of those whose punishments were detailed in the records were not incarcerated. Instead they were fined, demoted, restricted to their bases or removed from the military.
In about 30 cases, a letter of reprimand was the only punishment.
Several of the documents describe investigations that appeared to indicate a crime, but were dropped with little or no explanation.
Such is the case for an investigation that began in January 2008 against a Navy doctor who would go on to sexually abuse women in the military until his clinical privileges were suspended in 2009.
Airman Tina Wilson’s name is redacted from the report, but she spoke up a day after she went to the health clinic at Naval Air Facility Atsugi, a US base southwest of Tokyo, to have a dressing changed following surgery on her tailbone.
The doctor, Lt. Cmdr. Anthony L. Velasquez, walked over to look at the wound as a corpsman took care of the dressing. Then Velasquez announced that the results were in from a staph-infection test, and that he was going to check Wilson’s lymph nodes.
He checked her neck, then went under her shirt and ran his hands up the sides of her torso. Then he asked Wilson, whose pants were unzipped because of the dressing change, to lie on her side. He felt her left hip bone, then slid his hand down the front of her pants and under her panties.
Wilson pulled up her pants, and confused and shaken, headed for the door.
“I have to tell somebody,” Wilson said in a recent interview with the AP.
“What if he’s done this before, you know. There is a little girl right behind me that’s going to see this guy next,” she said explaining her decision to report the incident.
The Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) document summarizing the investigation prompted by Wilson’s complaint shows that three other women subsequently came forward, saying Velasquez had also touched them inappropriately.
Nevertheless, after 10 months the investigation was closed with no action.
According to the document, Yokosuka Naval Hospital declined to take any action against the doctor, and the Navy legal services office in Yokosuka determined the case would not be forwarded to Navy officials in San Diego who oversee medical operations in Japan.
Finally in 2010, after accusations from more than two dozen women, the Navy filed multiple counts of sexual misconduct and other charges against Velasquez.
Most of the charges were dropped under a plea deal.
Velasquez’s punishment: He served a week in the brig, was dismissed from the Navy, lost his license to practice medicine, and was required to register as a sex offender.
Retired Rear Adm. Richard B. Wren, the former commander of Navy forces in Japan who oversaw Velasquez’s court-martial, did not return telephone calls seeking comment.
Wilson, 27, left the Navy, distraught over how her case had been handled.
“It was the process that victimized me more than the day that he violated me,” Wilson said.
The number of sexual assault cases taken to courts-martial has grown steadily _ from 42 percent in 2009 to 68 percent in 2012, according to DOD figures. In 2012, of the 238 service members convicted; 74 percent served time.
“How many more rapes do we have to endure to wait and see what reforms are needed?” asked Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, a Democrat from New York.

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑